Archive for category Ten Questions With…

1. What made you open B.CANDY?

Ever since I was a little girl and saw Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory it became my dream to open a colorful and delicious world of sweets.

2. Does your family help out with the business?

My oldest and only daughter, Bayleigh, has coined herself the Lollipop Princess. She created our logo and now works full time on our social media, advertising, graphics and does a lot of crafting for the store. Bayleigh and the eldest boy, Briton, work in the store together serving ice cream and helping out wherever needed. Once football is finished, Barry might take a stab at it as well. Brennan, my youngest, is our official taste tester and a true candy connoisseur. He takes great pride in his job. My loving and patient husband, the dentist, puts in his two cents as well: always floss.

 

3. If so, what kind of responsibilities do you give your children and how do you get them involved with the business?

Getting a child of mine to work in a place as happy, colorful, and yummy as B.CANDY isn’t very hard. They tend to want to be there and always work for their share of ice cream, cupcakes, and candy. Not to mention, they get a roof over their heads.

 

4. How would you like to get your family further involved in B.CANDY?

Perhaps they end up taking over one day and I go on a  long vacation with my hubby. Now, wouldn’t that be nice.

 

5. Is it difficult to balance the demands of owning your own business and parenting? Any advice or tricks you can share with other parents in similar situations?

Allowing the children to feel involved and that their work is important is necessary. Showing appreciation means everything, even for all the little things.

 

6. What’s the best thing that has come out of the experience of starting B.CANDY?

My family has the opportunity to see and be apart of something we are all proud of. It’s a group effort for all of us. My wish is that they, too, learn to follow their dreams.

 

7. What are your plans for the business going forward?

Eventually, we would love to branch out and have multiple stores but we love the close-knit environment our flagship location currently has.  We will have to wait and see what the future has in store!

 

8. What is your favorite candy?

My favorite candy would have to be chocolate covered gummy bears but, really, my favorite sweet treat would be our Chocolate Covered Potato Chips & Caramel ice cream.

 

9. What is your children’s favorite candy?

The only candy Bayleigh likes is candy corn, Briton’s is licorice rope, Barry loves Snickers, & Brennan’s favorite (this week) is Sour Punch Punchies!

 

10. Any tips to share with parents for a fun Halloween candy treat?

Every Halloween our family loves to make gingerbread haunted houses. We decorate them with extra large gummy tarantulas, marshmallow peeps, candy corn brick walls, layers of licorice, and you can’t forget about the gummy worm graveyard. It makes a great centerpiece and tastes yummy too!

** Click here to enter for a chance to win a B. Candy Fav Box in this’ month’s giveaway! **

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Selecting a pediatrician is one of the most important first decisions a parent has to
make. And if all goes well, you will be partners in your child’s health until college
graduation! In fact, in my office often the relationship lasts even longer as my senior
partner now sees not only children of his patients but grandchildren of his former
patients as well.

As a pediatrician, I view the relationship as a collaboration between the child,
the parents, and myself. While we don’t have to agree on everything, I think it’s
important that we see eye to eye on certain fundamentals like safety, vaccines,
preventative health, and the use of medications. The earlier we understand each
others’ philosophies, the better.

How to choose a pediatrician? I would start by asking other members of your
community who they use, what they like, and what they don’t like about their
practice. Many offices now have practice websites. These are a great starting point
for general information about the number of doctors in the group, their bios, and
office hours.

Once you have a list of doctors, it’s often helpful to meet with them ahead of time
to find the right fit. Most pediatricians offer this visit as a courtesy to prospective
parents. Just sitting in the office waiting room listening to how the staff handles
established patients can provide a great deal of information about how the office
runs. And a face-to-face interview really helps parents get a sense of the doctor’s
practicing style. Since many parents rely on their pediatrician for both medical and
parenting advice, style can really become important.

The following are the topics I try to cover in my new patient interviews:

General information: It’s important to know how many providers are in the
group and if you will only see one doctor, or if the group shares its patients similar
to an obstetrics practice. Many offices now use nurse practitioners and physician
assistants too. You want to know who answers the phone — is it a receptionist or
a nurse who can give out medical information? Are there evening and weekend
hours? What about holidays?

Insurance: Practices can have many different policies regarding health insurance.
Some try to take most major plans, while some don’t participate at all. There
are also concierge practices where you pay an annual fee and high out of pocket
expenses each visit to ensure more time and personalized care. You need to be
aware of your own coverage. Do you have out of network benefits? What is your
deductible? This information will help you decide which practices are affordable for
you.

After Hours: There are many different ways that offices handle after hours calls.
All practices have 24/7 coverage. Some practices choose to handle their own after
hours calls, while others share the work with other pediatric offices. Some also use
a nursing triage call center. It’s a good idea to know what the average response time
is. Typically I aim for 30 minutes or less. You also want to be familiar with how the
practice handles patients who need to be seen after the office is closed. Are they
referred to a specific emergency room or urgent care center? Will your doctor meet
you there, or call ahead to let them know you are coming? Who will see your child if
he gets admitted overnight to the hospital?

Questions for the Doctor: How are your questions between visits handled? Does
a nurse return your call or the doctor? Can you expect to be called back before the
end of the day? Does your doctor communicate via email?

Schedule of Well Visits: How often are routine appointments? Usually it’s more
frequent in the first year of life and then for healthy children becomes bi-annual and
then annual from age 3 and up.

Selecting a pediatrician is one of the most important first decisions a parent has to
make. And if all goes well, you will be partners in your child’s health until college
graduation! In fact, in my office often the relationship lasts even longer as my senior
partner now sees not only children of his patients but grandchildren of his former
patients as well.

As a pediatrician, I view the relationship as a collaboration between the child,
the parents, and myself. While we don’t have to agree on everything, I think it’s
important that we see eye to eye on certain fundamentals like safety, vaccines,
preventative health, and the use of medications. The earlier we understand each
others’ philosophies, the better.

How to choose a pediatrician? I would start by asking other members of your
community who they use, what they like, and what they don’t like about their
practice. Many offices now have practice websites. These are a great starting point
for general information about the number of doctors in the group, their bios, and
office hours.

Once you have a list of doctors, it’s often helpful to meet with them ahead of time
to find the right fit. Most pediatricians offer this visit as a courtesy to prospective
parents. Just sitting in the office waiting room listening to how the staff handles
established patients can provide a great deal of information about how the office
runs. And a face-to-face interview really helps parents get a sense of the doctor’s
practicing style. Since many parents rely on their pediatrician for both medical and
parenting advice, style can really become important.

The following are the topics I try to cover in my new patient interviews:

General information: It’s important to know how many providers are in the
group and if you will only see one doctor, or if the group shares its patients similar
to an obstetrics practice. Many offices now use nurse practitioners and physician
assistants too. You want to know who answers the phone — is it a receptionist or
a nurse who can give out medical information? Are there evening and weekend
hours? What about holidays?

Insurance: Practices can have many different policies regarding health insurance.
Some try to take most major plans, while some don’t participate at all. There
are also concierge practices where you pay an annual fee and high out of pocket
expenses each visit to ensure more time and personalized care. You need to be
aware of your own coverage. Do you have out of network benefits? What is your
deductible? This information will help you decide which practices are affordable for
you.

After Hours: There are many different ways that offices handle after hours calls.
All practices have 24/7 coverage. Some practices choose to handle their own after
hours calls, while others share the work with other pediatric offices. Some also use
a nursing triage call center. It’s a good idea to know what the average response time
is. Typically I aim for 30 minutes or less. You also want to be familiar with how the
practice handles patients who need to be seen after the office is closed. Are they
referred to a specific emergency room or urgent care center? Will your doctor meet
you there, or call ahead to let them know you are coming? Who will see your child if
he gets admitted overnight to the hospital?

Questions for the Doctor: How are your questions between visits handled? Does
a nurse return your call or the doctor? Can you expect to be called back before the
end of the day? Does your doctor communicate via email?

Schedule of Well Visits: How often are routine appointments? Usually it’s more
frequent in the first year of life and then for healthy children becomes bi-annual and
then annual from age 3 and up.

Sick Visits: Are sick visits seen the same day? Most pediatric offices save space for
urgent appointments in the schedule so children can be seen the same day if they
are sick. Some office have a walk-in sick visit time while others have a specified call
time where you can be sure to get a same day appointment.

General Philosophies: This is probably the most important. You want to be
sure that you and your doctor can work together on general health topics like
breastfeeding (some offices have their own lactation consultants), vaccines, safe
sleeping practices, antibiotic use, your need for anticipatory guidance, injury
prevention, etc. Knowing this information from the start can avoid many conflicts
later on.

Are sick visits seen the same day? Most pediatric offices save space for
urgent appointments in the schedule so children can be seen the same day if they
are sick. Some office have a walk-in sick visit time while others have a specified call
time where you can be sure to get a same day appointment.

General Philosophies: This is probably the most important. You want to be
sure that you and your doctor can work together on general health topics like
breastfeeding (some offices have their own lactation consultants), vaccines, safe
sleeping practices, antibiotic use, your need for anticipatory guidance, injury
prevention, etc. Knowing this information from the start can avoid many conflicts
later on.

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Melanie is the proud mother of two little boys, Luke and Bradley and the ovwner of Sensitive Sweets Bakery, a place where kids (and adults) with food allergies can have safe treats. She also has an online store, where you can order mixes and ready made cakes, cupcakes, cookies, and more. We asked Melaine to shed some light on what it means to be gluten-free and how her bakery makes life a little sweeter for those suffering from food allergies … (Click through to read more)

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Sally Sampson is the founder and president of ChopChop Magazine, a quarterly food magazine and website for kids aged 5-12 and their families. Sally is also a James Beard Award-nominated author/co-author of 21 cookbooks and a frequent magazine contributor… (Click through to read the interview)

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25-year-old Allyson had a dream. In fact, it was a dream she had been building toward since age five — when she first began making breakfast for her mother — Allyson wanted to open a bakery. Allyson's bakery would be a literal wonderland for children and adults alike. Thus, Wonderland Bakery was born. Allyson is the mastermind and chef behind all of the confections and creations while her mom, Sondra, runs the company's business and marketing arm. We talked to Allyson and Sondra about how they make it happen, what advice they have for young bakers, supportive parents, and burgeoning entrepreneurs. (Click through for more) …

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Nina, Susan, and Ellen are three women who combined their skills and respective career histories to launch their own line of toys and products to help children understand their feelings. We talked to them about how they got started, where their inspiration comes from, and how their toys can help kids communicate better both at home and in the classroom…(Click through to read more)

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What happens when two of the funniest ladies on the internet, Alice Bradley and Eden M. Kennedy, got together and wrote their own version of "What to Expect When You're Expecting …"? "Let's Panic About Babies!" their tongue-in-cheek, hilarious look at pregnancy and parenthood. Think Mad Magazine (yes, they have pictures, too!) on pregnancy horomones. Alice and Eden took time out of their book tour schedule to answer a few of our questions about their book; their kids (Alice has a son, Henry, age eight. Eden's son, Jackson, is nine); and how they got to be so great …

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Chandra Greer owns one of our favorite stationery stores in the land, GREER Chicago. Chandra’s belief, “Civility is not a sign of weakness,” is a mission statement that extends well beyond the paper in her store and permeates everything she does in her life: from businesswoman, to wife, and mother to her two young daughters, Maya (age 8) and Eva (11).  She answered our ten questions thoughtfully, and with grace, humor, and, of course, civility. You can follow her on Twitter: @GreerChicago …

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We were very excited to talk to Peggy Orenstein, author of the new book, Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches From The Frontlines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture, because we've been faithful readers of her writing in the NY Times, which, if you haven't read her yet, you can start now (the archives are free).

Orenstein is also the author of the New York Times bestseller Waiting for Daisy … and Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self-Esteem, and the Confidence Gap. She has also been published in, among others, USA TodayVogueParentingO, The Oprah MagazineSalon; and The New Yorker. She lives in Northern California with her husband and their daughter, Daisy. You can follow her on Twitter at: @peggyorenstein Click through for full interview …

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